ANGELINE & SWAPAN | Japanese Tea Garden

These are engagement photos taken in San Francisco at the Japanese Tea Garden. The Japanese Tea Garden is a great place to take your engagement photos for many reasons….the lighting is always good, there are many great backgrounds and areas for photos and it’s generally wind free. So on those foggy, windy winter days when you need to take your engagement pics, the San Francisco Japanese Tea Garden is a sure thing.

JUST IN. Indian Wedding Photographer pics taken from this wonderful bride and groom’s wedding at the Casa Real at Ruby Hill Winery!

Japanese Tea Garden San Francisco Engagement Photos

Japanese Tea Garden San Francisco Engagement Photos

Japanese Tea Garden San Francisco Engagement Photos

In case you didn’t notice, this couple is actually an Indian Bride and Groom and they will have an Indian Wedding at Casa Real at Ruby Hill. Please click here to see INDIAN WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER in San Francisco.

Japanese Tea Garden San Francisco Engagement Photos

Japanese Tea Garden San Francisco wedding photos

I have shot many engagement and wedding photos at this wonderful San Francisco location. Here are some links of interests to my other image galleries.

http://www.robertvaldesphotography.com/engagement-session-san-francisco/

If you are thinking about taking photographs at the Japanese Tea Garden, please visit their website to find out the hours and entry fees.

http://japaneseteagardensf.com/visit.php
http://japaneseteagardensf.com/

F.Y.I.
The Japanese Tea Garden provides visitors from around the world with an opportunity to experience the natural beauty, tranquility and harmony of a Japanese-style garden in the heart of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park. Originally created as a “Japanese Village” exhibit for the 1894 California Midwinter International Exposition, the site originally spanned about one acre and showcased a Japanese style garden. When the fair closed, Japanese landscape architect Makoto Hagiwara and superintendent John McLaren reached a gentleman’s agreement, allowing Mr. Hagiwara to create and maintain a permanent Japanese style garden as a gift for posterity. He became caretaker of the property, pouring all of his personal wealth, passion, and creative talents into creating a garden of utmost perfection. Mr. Hagiwara expanded the garden to its current size of approximately 5 acres where he and his family lived for many years until 1942 when they, along with approximately 120,000 Japanese Americans, were forced to evacuate their homes and move into internment camps. When the war was over, the Hagiwara family was not allowed to return to their home at the tea garden and in subsequent years, many Hagiwara family treasures were removed and new additions were made.